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Adobe Releases Spry Framework for AJAX

JavaScript Library Can Be Used with Other AJAX Frameworks or the Flash Family of Products

Viewing the popularity of AJAX as a testament to the Rich Internet Application movement, Adobe isn't just talking about supporting that movement with tools and frameworks that work with and enhance Ajax...it's also doing something about it. Yesterday evening Adobe released the Spry Framework for AJAX "to accelerate the development of engaging experiences."

Available on the Adobe Labs web site (http://labs.adobe.com) free of charge starting last night, the first release of Spry, says Adobe, is "a preview of the data capabilities that enable designers to incorporate XML data into their HTML documents using HTML, CSS and a minimal amount of JavaScript, without the need for refreshing the entire page."

The Spry Framework for AJAX - a JavaScript library that web designers can use to build additional functionality in their web pages for a richer end-user experience - is HTML-centric, allowing web designers to use existing skills to design rich pages with Ajax without having to learn new languages or adopt a full programming model.

Spry was created specifically for web designers and the need that the web design community has for a light-weight framework. It's very flexible, and as such it can be used in conjunction with other AJAX frameworks or the Flash family of products.

"This is just the start of the project," says the Welcome page at the Adobe labs site. "We're releasing a preview build now so that you have plenty of time to give us feedback on what’s working for you, and what isn't. Your feedback and participation is important to us as we build out the framework."

"We set out to create a framework that leverages AJAX to deliver great experiences while truly fitting in with your current technologies and workflows," said Adobe's Paul Gubbay.

Gubbay continues:

"Spry was developed with the following three objectives:

Keep it open: Spry works with all HTML editors, including Dreamweaver. Anyone can download it off Adobe Labs to start building high performing interactive web pages and applications. No proprietary tags or server-side code needed.

Make it easy to use: Spry utilizes the same technologies that you already know to build web pages (HTML, CSS and JavaScript). Include a couple of JavaScript libraries with your page and you are ready to go. Create and style dynamic regions and interactive widgets using the same techniques as any other HTML elements on your page.

Enable innovation: At the end of the day, Spry is about delivering richer experiences for your customers. Spry provides a lightweight yet powerful model for adding data, interactivity, and rich UI widgets into your web pages while putting you in complete control of the design."

"Our hope is to extend this framework into reusable behaviors and UI widgets," Gubbay adds.

More Stories By RIA News Desk

Ever since Google popularized a smarter, more responsive and interactive Web experience by using AJAX (Asynchronous JavaScript + XML) for its Google Maps & Gmail applications, SYS-CON's RIA News Desk has been covering every aspect of Rich Internet Applications and those creating and deploying them. If you have breaking RIA news, please send it to [email protected] to share your product and company news coverage with AJAXWorld readers.

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Most Recent Comments
tonywong 05/11/06 03:16:59 AM EDT

> queZZtion commented on the 11 May 2006:
>
> Is that madman Cringeley still suggesting
> Apple should *buy* Adobe?

I think the market cap issue is the only thing keeping Apple from buying Adobe. On the other hand, I bet Adobe will not stray from Apple since Steve Jobs most likely talked to Bruce Chizen and 'told' him, 'the moment Adobe moves away from Mac software development is the moment when Apple releases a Photoshop competitor for Windows and Mac.'

tonywong 05/11/06 03:16:52 AM EDT

> queZZtion commented on the 11 May 2006:
>
> Is that madman Cringeley still suggesting
> Apple should *buy* Adobe?

I think the market cap issue is the only thing keeping Apple from buying Adobe. On the other hand, I bet Adobe will not stray from Apple since Steve Jobs most likely talked to Bruce Chizen and 'told' him, 'the moment Adobe moves away from Mac software development is the moment when Apple releases a Photoshop competitor for Windows and Mac.'

queZZtion 05/11/06 03:11:46 AM EDT

Is that madman Cringeley still suggesting Apple should *buy* Adobe? Since Adobe's market cap is north of $23 billion and Apple's is south of $60 billion, how'd he figure this was ever gonna happen?